Four recognizable stars. Four series of quotes that will make you snicker.

Some actors lean on their scripts a bit more than others.

For every star who can ad lib there are others who really, really need a script in hand. If you’ve ever seen an interview with Robert De Niro you get the idea. That doesn’t mean actors are necessarily dumb. Far from it.

Still, when actors speak (or Tweet) off the cuff the results can be … hilarious.

Over the past week we’ve seen four celebrity quotes that prove it. An Oscar winning actress. A veteran of not one but two beloved franchises. A rising star who recently joined the “Star Wars” universe. And a director who helped assemble Marvel Comics greatest heroes.

Each opened his or her mouth and inserted foot. And, at a time when Hollywood continues to lecture us on politics, it’s hard not to smirk.

Which of the following four quotes are the daffiest? You decide.

Brie Larson

What happens in today’s Hollywood when you win an Oscar? Ask Brie Larson. The actress earned her gold trophy for the 2015 gem “Room.” Now, she’s got two rewards coming to her – a superhero franchise (Captain Marvel) and a potential franchise.

The latter is “Kong: Skull Island,” hitting theaters March 10. It’s the kind of the film that screams box office gold, not a second Oscar trophy. And there’s nothing wrong with that.

Yet Larson feels compelled to defend taking the gig. In fact, she’s trying to turn it into an study in activism. Really.

“I make movies as a form of activism. I believe we learn from what we see in our leaders. I’m proud to play Mason Weaver in @kongskullislandmovie because she represents the many journalists who risk their lives everyday to share with us the truth. Weaver leads with compassion and believes that unity cannot be obtained through aggression.”

Patrick Stewart

He’s both Jean-Luc Picard AND Professor X. Not bad for one Shakespearean actor. His latest film finds him playing the latter role for the last time in “Logan.”

Stewart has more on his mind than retiring an iconic character. He wants to be a U.S. citizen.

The British star is excited at the thought of adopting America as his new home. Is it for our tradition of freedom? Our penchant for battling forces that threaten to enslave Europe? Our drive-in movie theaters?

No, no and no.

Here’s why he wants to become a U.S. citizen, according to his recent chat on “The View.” Fight President Trump.

“I’m not a [U.S.] citizen,” Stewart said. “However, there is, maybe it’s the only good thing, as the result of this election: I am now applying for citizenship. Because I want to be an American too … All of my friends in Washington said, ‘There is one thing you can do. Fight, fight, oppose, oppose.’”

Riz Ahmed

The young actor got the biggest break of his career when he was cast in “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story.” Now, he’s an in-demand star representing Hollywood’s “new” willingness to cast actors of color in critical roles.

Good.

He also represents the very worst when it comes to stars talking politics. Consider his wisdom regarding diversity in casting, a very real issue facing the industry.

Ahmed brought his message to the British Parliament, all but demanding U.K. studios hire more people of color. Or else.

“If we don’t step up and tell a representative story. .. we are going to start losing British teenagers to the story that the next chapter in their lives is written with ISIS in Syria,” he told Parliament. “We are going to see the murder of more [members of Parliament] like Jo Cox because we’ve been mis-sold a story that is so narrow about who we are and who we should be.”

Joss Whedon

How can we describe the talented director of “The Avengers” following Donald Trump’s election victory? Maybe Whedon himself said it best when he confessed to being “broken.”

He reassembled himself, apparently, and now his new mission is to alienate future audiences for his work.

Here’s Whedon talking about his activism in the Age of Trump as well as his feelings for those who made the mogul our new president.

“We have a mass movement going on. It just needs to prove it’s stronger than 60 million very misinformed voters who are not afraid to be uncaring and obnoxious.”

Unlike some stars, Whedon is keenly aware what his comments could mean to his future success. And he doesn’t care.

“If you have a forum, you speak out. It’s as simple as that. Does it always help? No, but sometimes what’s important is the simple act of someone speaking. Will there be a backlash? Always. But not speaking out is the Good German. You cannot ignore what is happening right now. I mean, I don’t want to talk about politics. It affects [the] way people view my work, in a very terrible way. I wouldn’t do it if the situation weren’t dire.”