"Saturday Night Live" is done celebrating its past. Now it's back to the present - running interference for President Barack Obama.

Last night’s episode, the first since the show’s epic 40th anniversary bash, opened with a stinging rebuke to former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani. His sin? Claiming that Obama didn’t love his country.

It’s such a wacky position it’s held by a large group of Americans, according to a new poll.

A plurality of Americans surveyed — 47 percent — said Obama loves America, but the rest of respondents said they don’t believe the president does or that they weren’t sure.

Clearly, Giuliani struck a nerve. It’s why the press went into overdrive. Reporters gave it more attention than such inconsequential matters like the lack of transparency in the Net Neutrality legislation or the Clintons accepting foreign money for their foundation.

Instead, the media pack slammed Giuliani. And “SNL” was only too happy to pile on.

“Saturday Night Live” once tried speaking truth to power. Now, the show protects the powerful. Giuliani isn’t currently running for office. He hasn’t held office for some time, and even then it was as a big city mayor. He’s not even in the discussion for the 2016 presidential election.

The New York city crowd watching Saturday’s show certainly didn’t find the skit uproarious. Maybe they remember how Giuliani transformed their city. Or they recall how he rallied them, and the country, after the horrifying attacks of 9/11.

To “SNL,” that monumental feat was just another laugh line.

Is is too much to ask for a political comedy show to mock the president? How about the vice president, a gaffe machine whose latest shtick involves serially nuzzling women who aren’t his wife.

Nothing funny there, right?

We’re still waiting the kind of classic presidential sketch surrounding the current administration we might see in the “SNL at 50” special.

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